Can I Plant Hydrangeas In The Fall

Can I plant hydrangeas in the fall? This is a wonderful question, especially since so many people are having success with their hydroslides. My response is always the same: Of course you can! The most important thing to remember is that it takes a bit of time to prepare your environment for your hydroslide.

In fact, it takes about three full growing seasons (about two or three months) before you can even consider planting your hydroslide. Why is this? It’s because it takes time for your root balls to form and harden. If you try to plant your hydroslide in the fall, you are going to be waiting until after your root ball has formed – which can take anywhere from four to six weeks. Then, you can fill it with some soil and start digging.

Growing Panicle Hydrangeas
Growing Panicle Hydrangeas

In addition to this, it can be difficult to properly fill in your hole with soil. You have to make sure that there is plenty of drainage and no water leaks anywhere near the hole. This last point is especially important if you live in an area where it snows. If the winter hits hard, then your hydrangeas may not survive. So, by the time you finish filling the hole, it is not a bad idea to plant the hydrangeas a bit deeper than normal.

In fact, I suggest that you do it right from the very beginning. As mentioned above, you need to wait until the ground is warm enough to hold the seed. Keep in mind that warm weather can dry out the soil quickly. And the last thing you want is to have your seedlings die from lack of water.

5 Helpful Tips for Planting Hydrangeas
5 Helpful Tips for Planting Hydrangeas

You will want to dig a hole that is slightly larger than the root system of your plant. This allows room for the roots to spread out without being drowned in water. Use the hole to place your pots on. Make sure that they are deep enough so that they will stay full of water.

After digging, fill the hole with dirt. Then start to prepare the soil by adding compost to it. You can either do this manually or with a spade. If you have a shovel, then that is even better.

Hydrangea Care – Pruning & Blooming Tips
Hydrangea Care – Pruning & Blooming Tips

Start to plant the seeds. If you are using seeds, make sure that you use a very good non-perlite seed which holds moisture well. Make sure that you plant them away from trees or other types of shade. Also try to plant them away from rocks or other hills or mountains. It is best to plant them about three inches deep.

When the seeds are ready, plant hydrangeas. You can also use a trellis if you have one. When the first few leaves appear, cut them off and hang them upside down in the hole. They should grow fast and you should be able to get all the way through the fall season planting.

After the first few leaves have appeared, remove them. They will rot and you do not want to have to re-paint the hole when the root ball dries out. It is also a good idea to check the hole weekly for moisture and if necessary water your newly planted hydrangea root balls. If they look dry, it could be that there is too much water in the soil and it needs to be watered more.

Gardening
Gardening

In the fall season, you can expect that the soil will be warm and if you dig the hole you will find it a bit cold. This is because the roots need to expand in order to handle the warmer temperatures. You can however, add some water to the hole to help it warm up. Once the ground is warm enough, you can then go ahead and place your hydrangea in the hole.

When the plant begins to swell, it may take a bit of time for its roots to reach the surface. You can ensure this by gently pushing on the roots. As long as they reach the surface, this is an indication that your plant has developed new leaves. It is important to gently press down on the plant as new leaves grow.

The beauty of hydrangeas is that they are a plant that can withstand dry spells and not have to worry about pruning during the dormant months. It can however, be a bit of a challenge to manage the amount of water they require throughout the season. If you cannot resist the prospect of plowing your hydrangea into the garden, do not hesitate to plow your plant growth in the fall.

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Little Lime®
Little Lime®